5Q's w/Adrian Mead "Misgivings" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters?

If you like the idea of a foul mouthed Glaswegian parrot giving fashion tips to a suicidal young guy...well Misgivings is the one for you.  

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

Despite the subject matter - a young man contemplates suicide - Misgivings is actually very funny and was recently very well received at a major Mental Health Film Festival.  We have won some awards, been shortlisted for others and had some really interesting discussions about how the subject of Mental Health should be approached by film and TV. 

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

Self taught and have worked as a writer director in UK film and TV for last 15 years.  Always something new to learn and I have really enjoyed returning to making a short film again.   

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

Misgivings was made as part of a development scheme for young people (16 -24) trying to break into the industry.  It was inspiring to see how they came together to form a professional crew in such a short time and coped with all the challenges that were thrown at them.  

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

Exploring the subject of Mental Health whilst making a funny and interesting piece was always risky. Thankfully the film is currently enjoying a successful festival run and has been really well received, long may it continue. I'm working on trying to get my next feature project off the ground and will hopefully be in production next year.  

5Q's w/Derek Parsons "Edward" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters

Edward is about outsiders, orderliness and intimacy.  Edward must choose between his way of life and the right way.  But what would you do?

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

Edward is the study of a man without feelings.  His fascination with other people’s lives is all about how “ordinary” people interact with each other, something he is not able to do.  

He only sees life in colour when looking through his lens, otherwise all is black and white.

Have not must of us been put in a position where we know more than we should and to say so will reveal too much of ourselves?  What if what we know is very important but also very damaging?

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

As a lawyer, I have always needed to write but I began writing for film about 7 years ago and thought that joining a film group would teach me the process of making a film and that would improve my writing.

With the support and encouragement of my local film groups (we are blessed with two in Southampton), I wrote, produced and Directed Edward.  My first ever project.

Without any doubt, my writing has improved just from going though that process.  I also found out that I enjoy producing and have gone on to produce a number of short films and have one feature in development.

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

It really is about the personal relationships - and the catering!  Everyone worked long hours and mostly for free.  Their commitment was humbling and it means I will help them all in any way I can.

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

Edward is still going to festivals but has now been added to with two new shorts, Time to Pay which has already been shortlisted for some festivals and Treble Clef which is currently in post production.

I hope to produce other feature projects, using these short films as evidence of my writing and producing abilities.

5Q's w/Jeronimo Bertran "Ruta Madre" Producer by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters?

Based on a true story, Ruta Madre is a funny road trip dramedy about a young American singer who travels to Mexico to regain his lost roots.

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

Ruta Madre is not only very funny and entertaining, but it is also very rich in its visual beauty, in how the story is told, amplified through the eyes of a young kid who has never been to Mexico.  It is weaved in such a way, that the dramatic part of the story creeps in slowly and silently, creating a very heartfelt moment at the end.  It also has a powerful message about how important it is to know your cultural and family roots in order to be a well-grounded individual.

The talented cast features a blend of new up-and-coming talent including David Castro, William Miller and Paulina Gaitan, coupled with some of Mexico’s most legendary actors such as Carmen Salinas and Angelica Maria.  Ruta Madre features a captivating score and all original songs from both sides of the border that are guaranteed to leave a melody in your ear, long after the credits have rolled.

The magnificent production design of Marco Niro (Master and Commander, The 33, All is Lost) captures the colors, essence, and magic of Baja that will resonate with an ever growing Latin American audience. Ruta Madre conveys a resounding message of love, family and a celebration of culture that will charm people of every nationality regardless of what side of the border you call home.

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

As a child and all the way through high school, my biggest passion was movies.  I remember spending long hours in middle school with my friend Rodrigo Prieto making films with my Super 8 Beaulieu camera.  Rodrigo went on to become an Academy Award-nominated cinematographer whose work I greatly admire.  In my last year of high school I had two great passions, movies and technology.  I continued my studies in Computer Science and after that started a technology company.  After 33 years I thought it was time to pick up where I left off.  Ruta Madre is my first film and has been an amazing journey. 

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

There are so many lessons learned in this project.  We worked with a bi-national, bi-lingual and bi-cultural cast, crew and musicians who all worked together passionately to deliver the best film possible.  To see them all come together and put so much faith and love into this project and to see how hard they worked every day was a truly humbling experience.

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

We are submitting the film to a few festivals and are currently seeking distribution with hopes of getting it to a wider audience.   We are also working on a couple new projects in film.

5Q's w/Paolo Monico "The Mother" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters

The Mother, inspired by a true story, is for those who think that films can be poignant and funny at the same time. Just like life itself.

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

The Mother is a love letter to my father who passed away in 2002 from an asbestos-related disease. Therefore, the backdrop of my story is the terrible legacy of asbestos and the asbestos-related diseases. People think asbestos is a thing of the past, something related to miners and sailors.  But the truth is that every American is unknowingly subjected to exposure every day. Everybody needs to acknowledge that asbestos is a toxin that the US failed to regulate for too long. It is time for Congress to resist the enormous pressures of industry and push for legislation that would stop the imports and ban asbestos once and for all.

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

I have been working on commercials and music videos for almost 20 years. I never felt the urge to bring my personal stories to life until a couple of years ago I found out that, after more than 10 years, I still hadn’t overcome my grief and anger. That’s what triggered the writing of “The Mother."

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

I found out that I wasn’t alone: you might start making movies to talk about yourself, your grief, your anger, anything that bothers you. But then you find out that this very personal and sometimes obscure, unexplainable feelings somehow connect with your fellow human beings. So, if I may pass something that I have learned in the process, I would tell to all filmmakers out there: do your thing, talk about anything that is incredibly meaningful to you and NEVER be afraid that people won’t get it.

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

There’s a whole community of asbestos related victims who are waiting for their "Erin Brockovich" kind of film. So this is what I’m working on right now: I’m developing a feature script based on my short “The Mother” and I’m doing this for the community of incredibly brave people that I have met throughout this amazing adventure I started 2 years ago.

5Q's w/Steve Oldfield "Lines of Sight" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters

You’ll learn about a daring new painting style & meet the directors that befriended the artist, as well as hear from Jim Hall, the 85 year old painter, himself.

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

Painter Jim Hall created the daring new style of Lineillism after his sight was temporarily marred by a case of Shingles. He saw the world in lines, but instead of panicking, he started painting what he was seeing - in all vertical lines. Our Documentary,  Lines of Sight, isn’t just about Jim’s exciting new artform -- it’s a truly inspiring story about a man who has overcome everything from alcoholism to homelessness. Jim spent a year living on the beach in Santa Monica. He then ended up as a company man for Procter and Gamble, settling in a suburb of Cincinnati.

While he climbed the corporate ladder, Jim kept up his passion for painting. He is an everyman with an extraordinary talent and his work has been favorably compared to Monet and Van Gogh among other masters. As one young art student said, thanks to Jim, “Art History is still being made today.”

#3:  What is your movie making background? Tell us about yourself.

I started making my own Wayne’s World style tv shows in high school that aired on the Public Access Channel in Northern Kentucky - mine were more “newsy.” I founded Northwestern (University) Student Television during my sophomore year, where I majored in Journalism and studied film criticism and social documentary photography. I was a nationally syndicated film critic for Fox TV stations for more than a decade, covering Sundance and Toronto and interviewing nearly every major director and star.

At Sundance, I asked Robert Redford what one ingredient all successful filmmakers share. He quickly answered: “Passion.” I interviewed doc directors who’d taken a second mortgage on their homes and maxed out their credit cards because they just HAD to tell a story. Twenty years after interviewing Redford, I found that story in artist Jim Hall.

Luckily, it costs a LOT less to make a doc these days - and I simply got a Best Buy card, bought a 4 K camera and an “action cam” - and we were off to the races! I also mentor high school documentary filmmakers. My students have gone onto successful careers at USC Film School, Harvard, Northwestern and other great programs.

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?  I have four:

1) Even if your project is open-ended, create a deadline and stick to it. That’ll keep everyone working toward a goal and on-task.

2) If a crew person is always negative, no matter how talented, cut them loose.

3) Don’t tell the subject of your doc (or the stars of your feature) you got a waiver for Sundance and you’re hoping to get in - It can devastate those around you if you don’t get accepted;

4) And never wait to interview someone - We hopped on a plane to California to catch a key contributor just before he was having “routine” surgery. It’s a good thing: he ended up having four surgeries and his jaw wired shut for months - by the time he was able to talk, we’d long since finished and submitted our film.

linesproduction2steveandjimhall.jpg

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

We are designing Lines of Sight: Lineillism Revealed, a traveling exhibit that will feature 10 original Lineillism paintings, a time-lapse video from the doc and museum-style panels that walk the visitor through Jim’s life. We will also feature the doc and master painting classes with Jim where possible. We already have nearly a dozen museums, community centers and libraries committed in our area and hope to take the exhibit on the road across the country and internationally. We are also creating a lesson plan for art teachers and we hope to eventually air Lines of Sight on television and create a DVD that includes additional content for learners of all ages.

Our website is www.linesofsightdocumentary.com

5Q's with Christian de la Cortina "Generation Wolf" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters?

In order to save his father’s house from repossession, Vincent starts a Marijuana farm. As Vincent falls into the world of crime, his situation grows more brutal and dangerous. As a wolf, he will have to survive. 

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

About 25% of this film was shot in California. We flew our crew from Montreal, Canada and shot. I really loved the vibe in California. People from Borrego Springs will certainly recognize the desert on the Poster… The cool vintage cars were also built in San Diego. Many shots of the desert were filmed near Borrego Springs as well. 

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

I’ve always wanted to become an actor but my parents insisted I should get a “real degree” first. That’s what I did, I studied commerce at Sherbrooke University and after getting my diploma, I followed my dream.  After a while of getting small little roles in Montreal, I quickly realized I would have to make my own films to make it in the movie business. So I kept chasing my dream as an actor by becoming a filmmaker as well. This was probably the best decision of my life. Creating, writing, directing and acting is amazing. Like the actor/filmmaker Tyler Perry said, “Be the onewho owns the boat.” While you wait for new roles or auditions, nothing stops you from writing and creating you own film. It’s not easy but it’s definitely worth it!

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

Many lessons… I finally found my voice as a director. Now I know what type of films I really want to make. Films that will entertain, empower and educate as well. 

I’ve also learned that you must have faith when you make a film. Faith that everything will go well, that you’ll find the right crew, the right actors and that God will also guide you through it and reward your efforts. Many times during the making of Generation Wolf, my production had adivine intervention that I cannot explain. I felt blessed. When everything should have gone wrong, well… everything went well. I’ve also learned that you must surround yourself with passionate people that believe in your dream and are motivated by your film, not by money. 

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

I do believe and hope that Generation Wolf will sell well around the world because of it’s message and international flavour.  I’m also convinced that it will help establish my career as an actor/filmmaker and will bring myself to greater things (film or roles) . 

5Q's w/Carolyn Saunders "The Wasting" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters?

Young love, sexual awakening, possessive parents, a control battle that leads to anorexia. And a nightmare of a ghost. What’s not to love?

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

The Wasting is inspired by a young woman I met when I was writing a documentary series called Ghostly Encounters. She was anorexic and could get nobody to believe that a ghostly hag was trying to suffocate her every night. I wanted to explore the hell of having a mental illness steal your credibility, so that when the line between  perception and reality becomes blurred, the person with illness is the one who doesn’t get to have a voice. It’s very much a film about all the deeper issues behind anorexia, and it’s about how everything happens because of relationships – with her parents, her boyfriend, her best friend and the dynamic between the two brothers in the film. Oh, and the music absolutely kicks ass.

The brothers in the film - Brendan Flynn and Sean Stevenson - are brothers in real life.

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

I wrote doc TV series for a decade to feed my kids, while writing feature film scripts in the dead of night. I was working on a film in Saskatchewan in a winter that was colder than Mars, as Alison Eastwood’s stand-in (don’t look anything like her..I wish!) and I showed her my first script, a dark comedy called Drilled. To my utter shock, she loved it, and she was so encouraging and supportive, it gave me the confidence to know I could do this. (And she has been continually encouraging in the years since then, I might add – everybody needs people in their corner who believe in them) Anyway, I carried on, I got a job as a script analyst for one of Canada’s biggest funding agencies, I read hundreds of scripts and my understanding of story grew and grew. Drilled is going to be shot this year with Jason Priestley directing, and in the meantime I wrote The Wasting for me to direct. As a debut female director, it was a tough road getting it made – the story of the making of this film is a movie in itself, full of intrigue, betrayal, joy, an English village of wonderful eccentrics, and several God-given miracles. But in the end, a lot of people believed in me and the story and together we got it done. Now I’m working on my next feature, a dystopian sci-fi called Island West. So the adventure continues, and I am the happiest person on the planet.

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

Always look forward, never look back. When things go wrong, keep the faith that got you this far, and don’t look for blame, look for solutions. Looking for blame wastes your time, and time is worth more than gold when you’re making a film. And keep praying.

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

We’re doing the festival rounds, and are looking at a theatrical release in the spring, followed by VOD. All that is still in the works right now. Our lead, Lauren McQueen, is about to be all over British TV screens in a big series, so we’re hoping that generates a lot of interest in this film. She is absolutely mesmerizing in The Wasting and we were lucky to get her when we did.

5Q's w/Annie O'Neil "Phil's Camino" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters?

Anyone  who has known someone who has dreamed of doing something impossible.  If you haven't, maybe you will after you see this film!

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

That this is an uplifting film!  It is one that will stay with you long after the credits roll by.

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

I have been an actress, director and producer but this is my first film!  I co produced and was featured in a documentary called Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago and it was a life changing experience.  

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

All things are possible if you allow them to be different from how you think they should be.

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

More travel, more opportunities to touch people's hearts.  I am currently working on an expanded, hour long version of Phil's Camino and am excited to see that come together.  I am writing a screenplay and am currently finishing another short film.  Many more ideas, too!  

Thank you so much!

Peace-
A

5Q's w/Andrew Wilcox "Some Kind of Quest" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters?

"Some Kind Of Quest" finds us in the advanced years of an artist's life, as he struggles to maintain his life's work, a 52,000 square foot model train town. 

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

This film is as much an inspiration to creative people, as it is a cautionary tale.  

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

"Some Kind of Quest" was my directorial debut. I left the world of creative advertising to create this film.

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

When making a documentary, have a very clear idea of what you want the story to be. Next, don't resist when the story becomes something else entirely. 

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

On the heels of this film, I've signed on with a new production company called "Hone." I'm jumping head first into the exciting and intimidating world of commercial directing. I also hope to create more documentaries as the inspiration strikes.  

5Q's w/Patrick Biesemans "Embers and Dust" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters:

Embers & Dust is a meditative look at a young farm boy’s imagination during the infamous 1938 Orson Welles broadcast of War of The Worlds. Wonderment fills the atmosphere and transports you to a creatively intoxicating moment in American broadcast history.

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

Embers & Dust is a period piece, it has some sci-fi and fantasy DNA in it but at the core it is a family drama.

#3: What is your movie making background? Tell us about yourself.

Planned elaborate plots with my Batman, Terminator, and Robocop action figures; graduated to running around with a digital 8mm camcorder in the backyard with my younger brother and best friends; studied animation and design in college; moved to New York and started directing anything and everything I could get my hands on.

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

Always have the project you want to make, regardless if you have the means to, on hand and ready to go. You never know when the opportunity to get your passion project made will present itself... And if you’re making a passion project, don’t waiver in your creative vision.

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

I hope that Embers & Dust finds an audience far and wide, and finds a place in the hearts of filmmakers and audience members alike. As for myself? I’m on the long road to writing, producing, and directing a feature film.

5Q's w/Adam Bradshaw "Boy Soldier" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters?

"Boy Soldier" is an honest story about divorce seen through the lens of a boy that many audience members can personally connect with.

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

We are proud to admit that this film was made in just 48 Hours from writing to editing. 

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

Our production team Transplant Pictures has been working together now for 6 years making various short films, music videos and web series. Comprised of mostly "transplants" to Los Angeles our talented group loves working together to tell great stories.

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

As a team that, before this film, had done mostly comedy projects, tapping into a more personal story for many of the cast and crew we were both surprised and proud of this film and look forward to making more like it. 

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

We are currently developing our first feature film and enjoying traveling the festival circuit and sharing "Boy Soldier" with audiences all over the country. 

5Q's w/Jeff Palmer "Split Costs" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters?

Two women hit the road and life hits back in this gritty drama that shares the lane with movies like Thelma & Louise and Five Easy Pieces.

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

In January 2016 we raised nearly $2,000 for this micro-budget project on GoFundMe and went into production during late February. As the film's writer, directer, producer, cinematographer and editor, I was presented with an array of logistical challenges such as shooting guerrilla in Panera Bread, getting a variety of camera angles inside a cramped compact car, and audio mixing with engine and highway noise... but such is the thrill of independent filmmaking and capturing intimate stories on a shoestring. The 24-minute film has an all-female cast and "passes the Bechdel test with flying colors." Split Costs features New York actress Mela Hudson (Emma) and indie newcomer Tori Hall (Judy) and was primarily shot inside a moving Ford Focus (driven by Hudson) over the course of an unseasonably warm February weekend. As written in the script the ride share takes place in the bleak of winter, but as it turned out filming took place during the warmest winter on record, forcing us to drive north of Boston into New Hampshire to capture certain scenes where mounds of snow were necessary for the backdrop. If you like road trip mix tapes with indie rock, we got you covered.

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

I've been making music videos, short films, documentaries, and writing screenplays for the past 20 years. Currently I am enrolled in a 1-year masters program at Boston University for Cinema and Media Production with a focus on directing. The majority of my work can be found at FlickerPictures.com

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

Every now and then there is a tipping point when you need to follow Nike's mantra and "Just do it." Only as filmmakers we "Just shoot it." Casting is key. It's critical to collaborate with folks who 'get it' and who respect the gravity of the work, the craft, which is what made filming Split Costs such a joy and an overwhelmingly rewarding creative endeavor. We jumped off the ledge and built a film on the way down. Believe in your story, trust your collaborators, give freely and be open to the possibilities of discovering something unexpected and truthful along the filmmaking journey.

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

Split Costs continues to make the rounds in the festival circuit and claim a few awards along the way, which is always a bonus. While I study at Boston University, I hope the characters portrayed by Mela and Tori get more screen time in front of audiences hungry for this brand of unapologetic arthouse storytelling. 

5Q's w/Mallory Grolleau "Notorious Corn" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters?
It’s about success and its backside. I guess it’s to be seen because it says very very much in a very very short time.

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?
The point is not if our corn will become famous or not. It will! It’s about what it is to be famous in a consumer society.

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.
I’ve been a technician for some years (1997-2005). I was cameraman and lighting technician on TV and film sets, and also in theaters. Meanwhile, I directed my first shorts (Super 8mm, Super 16mm/35mm) and I learned a lot watching the others working (I’m self-taught).
Since 2005, I directed a documentary for television broadcast, many other shorts, music videos, corporate and commercial films. My first full length feature was released in France in September 2016. It was a great achievement for my team and me. For more details, please take a look on my website : www.mallorygrolleau.com

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?
I knew it before, but it was confirmed once more with this short: working with talented and cool people is a privilege!

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?
We hope to bring “Notorious Corn” to more and more festivals.
We currently are working on an animated story that still could be either a full length feature or a TV show. Crossing fingers for it’s success!!

5Q's w/Matt Bosson "Desperate Manny" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

SUNDAY | BLOCK K | 1:15 | DESPERATE MANNY (26min)

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters

At night, Manny wrestles with his demons, trying to save his young son and himself. Having drawn two others into his plight, an old friend and a stranger, he’s not sure whom he can trust.

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

Desperate Manny is a dark, suspense-crime drama – a kind of neo-noir Western. Our protagonist, Manny, is hiding out with his son, because he’s lost legal custody of the boy. His old friend and confidant, Neil, is on the phone trying to talk sense into him, and soon we learn Manny is holding a hostage -- a female police officer who pulled him over as he was speeding away with his son. Now Manny and Officer Reyes must each figure out how to save the boy and survive the night. It’s a story about love, addiction, courage – and unintended consequences.

#3: What is your movie making background? Tell us about yourself.

I’m a first-time director/filmmaker, but I’m also a musician, writer and medical graphics supervisor on TV’s Grey’s Anatomy. With a background in theater and music, I came to Los Angeles more than 20 years ago and have been working steadily in film and television production, coordinating video and computer graphics under the name, Hawkeye Images. I also play guitar, bass guitar and sing, currently in a hard-rock band, The Returned; and also with my wife Leslie in country-rock band, The Running Kind – whose album, “The Girl For All The World,” was released in 2010, receiving worldwide critical acclaim and a Pick of the Week in the LA Weekly.
Both in music and film, I like to create moods, and then find the characters within. From the characters, a story can form - almost of its own accord. I’m especially drawn to characters that are in a moment of crisis.

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

I think the greatest lesson I learned during the process of making Desperate Manny, was how truly collaborativeitwas. IwasfortunatetobeabletoworkwithsomeverytalentedfolksonManny– friends and colleagues, and sometimes complete strangers – that all contributed to make this film great! We raised our budget through crowd-sourcing – Indiegogo.com – which in many ways, was the hardest part of the process for me. We assembled an amazing cast and crew, shot in 4 jam-packed days, and worked meticulously on editing and scoring – as well as sound sweetening and color- correction – all with ongoing collaboration from people who only had an interest in seeing a good short film get made. And for that, I’m truly grateful.

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

Manny has been in the festival circuit for about 6 months now – with screenings in Breckenridge, Colorado and Studio City, California – and Peter Brooke recently won an award for Best Actor in a Short! With a little luck, we’re hoping to find a distribution platform, so that viewers can watch Desperate Manny at home. I’m also writing more storylines for Manny and Officer Reyes – perhaps to become ongoing episodes, or maybe a feature film.
In the meantime, I’ve got a short comedy in the works - a story about not hearing correctly and the ramifications that can have... Hoping to have that ready to go to festivals in 2018!

5Q's w/Dawn Engle "Rigoberta Menchú: Daughter of the Maya" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

| DAUGHTER OF THE MAYA dir: Dawn Engle | Saturday | BLOCK I | 3:30 | 

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters

Rigoberta Menchu: Daughter of the Maya tells the story of justice from the viewpoint of one girl, Rigoberta Menchu. It's a must-see for those interested in Human Rights and Social Justice. 

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

In the early 1980s, over 30,000 indigenous people were killed or went missing in Guatemala during their civil war. It has only been recently that justice is coming to the victims. 

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

This is the 3rd film in the Nobel Legacy Film Series, which tells the life stories of Nobel Peace Prize winners from around the world. Husband and wife team, Ivan Suvanjieff and Dawn Engle, have worked closely with the laureates over the past 20 years, filming and interviewing them over that time. In 2012, they began working on the series in order to share the stories with the world. 

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

We have a saying that "things will get done only if you do them." 

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

Our next film, "Oscar Arias: Without a Shot Fired" premieres in June 2017, followed by "Dalai Lama: Scientist" in June 2018. 

5Q's w/Michael Chan "CAVITIES" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters?

This is a story about growing up in a broken home. Wince longs for a family that isn’t there as he hustles to make money to replace the need family with friends. Sometimes it is the intangible things we desire most in life, the need for love.

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

Wince is a hustler.

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

After I got out the Marine Corps in 2008, I attended LaGuardia Community College back in New York. I transferred over to USC’s School of Cinematic Arts in 2010 and graduated in 2012. Through ABC’s Standing Up For Heroes, I was given a mentor, Victoria Alonso at Marvel Studios. I was fortunate and blessed to get the opportunity to get my start at Marvel Studios. After three shows at Marvel, I ventured out to my next journey at the American Film Institute to focus on directing. In June 2016, I graduated with my MFA in Directing and is currently working on trying to make the feature version of Cavities. Anybody interested?

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

Stick to your guns and do what you say you were going to do. I’ve had a lot of obstacles trying to get Cavities made, lots of road blocks and spikes on the road but I have always been a hustler just like Wince Cheng.

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

Munis and I wrote the feature script and we hope to turn those pages into moving images.

5Q's w/Dimitris Katsimiris "BIRTHDAY" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

| BIRTHDAY (13min) dir: Dimitris Katsimiris | BLOCK J | SUNDAY 10:00 |

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters?

Marios, a young man with cerebral palsy, is waiting for his uncle to celebrate his 22nd birthday.

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

The role model of Marios is not a human being but a superhero. The first scene open with a dream of Marios being Superman.

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

I was born and raised in Rhodes and I’ve studied and worked as a social worker. In recent years I live and work in Athens as an actor, writer and director in theater and I’ve written two theatrical plays. 'Birthday' is my first short film.

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

It doesn’t matter which camera did you choose to shoot, how much money did you spent but the most essential thing in a film is the truth of your story.

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?
Birthday has already won 7 awards all over the world. Every official selection and screening at the festivals is something important for us. That’s gives us hope and courage for our next projects. 

5Q's w/Haixu Liu "BEYOND THE CURTAIN" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

"BEYOND THE CURTAIN" SATURDAY | BLOCK H | 1:00 |

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters

Cinematography, design and music are combined to tell a story of humanity between a criminal and a young boy in 1960's China. 

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

The film focuses on what the invisible future holds beyond the blinding curtain, but the seemingly touching story does not give an answer. It is only the human desires that drive us in a loop: we all want to redeem or achieve. Realize that, the protagnist's story is just one among many lives of that time period. Some more tragic, some more touching, but no piece of history information is ought to have any meaning. At the end, the ghost characters say: everyone is an ephemeral piece of drifting petal, among many mortal lives. As human beings we cannot live without a purpose, so we must believe in the humanities especially of the story, even though we are aware that the ghosts may be just right.

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

I made my first film when I was 16 and I have been composing music for all of my films. My first film was a big step for me since it made me to taste what film festivals like. I won several high school film festivals awards including Best Experimental and three nominations at All American High School Film Festival at AMC 25 at Times Square. Thanks to my first film, I got into NYU Tisch film school 2 years later, and I am about to graduate as a junior next year.

Ironically, it is after my biggest short film, that I realized film making perhaps will take more time for me to socialize and network, which I understand. However, I always wanted to make a difference not just as an artist, but someone with the voice to show the insight and creativity. I decided to develop a Virtual Reality platform, half a year ago, that would allow people to create a totally separate 24/7 live world with a very unique technology that we are programming. This platform is not an isolated VR thing. It is just as enjoyable on any daily device. Again, this time I will be responsible for its music and art direction. It is close to being finished. With the right marketing strategy, I hope I will speak directly to the public in early upcoming year when it releases.

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

If you want your art matters, it has to be seen, not by a hundred or a thousand. 'Will people see this without me telling them on social media?' should be the sole standard question we ask ourselves before making anything. Simply put, no one wants to make a film to watch it by her/himself. This is a very creative age. Do not follow the old ways.

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

I decided to develop a Virtual Reality platform, half a year ago, that would allow people to create a totally separate 24/7 live fantasy world with a very unique technology that we are programming every day and night. This platform is not an isolated VR thing nor a 360 video platform, and it is just as enjoyable on any daily device. Storytelling, visual arts, performance art and musics will be shown in re-designed way, accessible but engaging. Again, this time I will be responsible for its music and art direction. It is close to being finished. With the right marketing strategy, I am hopeful that it will appeal to the mass public and I am ready to show more about myself as an artist and insight. Speaking of film, making a feature film totally based on this platform is my goal after finishing it next year. Due to the funding nature of the platform, I hope this next film is internationally funded by both the U.S. and China and gets a theatrical run in both countries.(let's hope for the best, it all depends on the platform)

I would be glad to collaborate with anyone that is looking for creating contents and I am confident that the platform will be a very good exposure for all kinds of artists.

 

 

 

5Q's w/Neal Dhand "Crooked and Narrow" Director by Matthew Nothelfer

CROOKED AND NARROW (89min) dir: Neal Dhand | BLOCK A | THURSDAY 4:00 |

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters?

Throwback heist film set in Philadelphia. Dark and sometimes funny with a quiet, badass female lead, and a monologuing, violent antagonist.

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

It’s about family as much as it is about robberies. The film is, in part, indebted to The Friends of Eddie Coyle and Charley Varrick. I made Crooked & Narrow as a way to work with Lindsay Goranson (the lead actress) again, and as a way to show off a side of Philadelphia that isn’t usually seen on-screen - no Liberty Bell or Art Museum steps here.

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

This is my second feature film. The first one, Second-Story Man, premiered at Cinequest 21 and the Shanghai International Film Festival. I’m a professor when not writing, directing, producing, and editing. 

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?

Having collaborators that you trust - and vice versa - is essential.

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

We'll continue to show Crooked & Narrow at festivals and elsewhere. I’m in development on two science fiction projects: Zippers is about gun violence and changing urban neighborhoods; The Lighthouse is about a severed foot. I hope to shoot one in 2017-2018.

5Q's w/Kevin Resnick and Rebecca Norris Resnick "Cloudy With A Chance Of Sunshine" filmmakers by Matthew Nothelfer

#1: Can you describe your movie and why somebody should see it in less than 140 characters?

Our film is a hilarious, quirky, and heartfelt comedy that Hollywood just doesn't produce anymore.  Now what could be better than that?  :)

#2: What do you want the Borrego Springs Film Festival audience to know about your film that isn’t obvious from its title?

As a rom-com, our film certainly has a lot of heart but what isn't obvious from the title, is just how funny the film is.  We gathered together a group of insanely talented character actors that bring a special brand of comedy to each of their roles and make you genuinely laugh out loud throughout the film.  

#3: What is your movie making background?  Tell us about yourself.

Rebecca and I have made several short films together, several of which have gone on to win awards on the festival circuit.  We were honored to have our last short screen at the Cannes Film Festival in France.  All of our work has been in the comedy genre.  "Cloudy" is our debut feature film.

#4: What was the biggest lesson learned in getting your film made?
We learned about the importance of taking as much time as you need in pre-production and not rushing the process.  Particularly when it comes to ensuring that your story is tight.  Be sure to get feedback from other trusted writers and filmmakers! 

#5: What does the future hold for your film and you?

We are currently seeking distribution for our film and hope to get it out to a wider audience within the next year.  We also have several projects in development to include feature films and TV pilots.